Mapping traffic signals and stop signs using MapRoulette

In our journey of improving  the OpenStreetMap we are constantly searching for  open source data. This search is very important and is done before we start improving the map in a new area.

Currently, part of our team is focused on improving the Detroit area. So, before we started mapping we searched for useful geospatial data and we came across open data about traffic signals and stop signs for Wayne County, Detroit. The data can be found here and here.

Traffic signals mapped in OSM
Stop signs mapped in OSM

We filtered out the traffic signals and stop signs that were already in OSM but there is still a significant amount of data that can be added in OSM. (912 – traffic signals and 8755 – stop signs). Due to this, we thought about creating a MapRoulette challenge.

About MapRoulette

MapRoulette is a micro-tasking tool used to fix bugs in OpenStreetMap and to improve it. A user can create tasks by uploading files which contain the location, ways, points with the error that has to be fixed or files with features that are missing from the map and can be added by other users.

When creating a new task, the user gives specific instructions on what steps have to be followed to edit through this tool. Once a user has logged in, he can see on the map the created challenge and the pins which consists of tasks he can solve.

So, given the available data that we found, we created two challenges – one for traffic signals and the other for stop signs. Some general rules for mapping traffic signals and stop signs can be found on the OSM wiki – here and here.

Tags that we use for mapping
  • Stop signs – highway=stop
  • Traffic signals – highway=traffic_signal
Notes
  • If the traffic signal/stop sign is referring to all the highways entering the intersection, we add the traffic signal/stop sign in the intersection point.

  • If the traffic signal/stop sign is not referring to all the highways entering the intersection we add the traffic signal/stop sign before the intersection, where the sign/signal is positioned.
  • We need to add an additional tag if the road is bidirectional:
    • for traffic signals we use the traffic_signals:direction key with the forward or backward values to indicate the affected direction.

    • for stop signs add direction=forward or direction=backward to indicate the affected direction.

The data has been published under Public Domain license.

Everyone who is keen on mapping is welcomed to help us.

Let’s improve OSM together!

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More and Updated Data for ImproveOSM

ImproveOSM has been updated with many new roads. We processed recent  GPS data from a number of data partners with some great results. A total of 30,000 new missing road tiles were added, over 17000 in Indonesia alone.

Aside from the missing roads, we added 67000 potential missing one-way roads that we detected with high confidence. Internal testing revealed only 6% false positives.

We are happy to continue providing OSM mappers with high quality data about missing things in OSM based on billions of GPS traces. Because ImproveOSM is based on actual drives from people using navigation or mapping software in their vehicles, and we apply a pretty high threshold for number of trips and quality of the GPS data, you can be pretty confident that every ImproveOSM feature will lead you to something you can add to OSM. Even if the aerial imagery is poor.

You should see the new data in your ImproveOSM plugin or on the ImproveOSM web site very shortly. Happy mapping and let us know what you mapped using ImproveOSM!

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Improve OSM adds missing roads in Guatemala

In a new data release today, we added about 500 tiles worth of missing roads in and around Guatemala!

Missing roads near Coatepeque, Guatemala
Missing roads near Coatepeque, Guatemala in JOSM. Imagery from Bing.

We are excited to be adding more and more Missing Roads data to ImproveOSM using GPS data from our own users as well as from data partners, like we did in Brazil and in this case.

You will notice that the tiles look a little different from the ones you are used to if you have used ImproveOSM before: they don’t show the individual points. This is because this particular data was processed a little differently. If you use JOSM, you will also see an update to the ImproveOSM plugin to accommodate this change.

While you are looking at the new Missing Roads, perhaps you will also notice some other recent improvements to the ImproveOSM web site. We re-ran all tiles based on new map data from mid-April, and we improved our turn restriction detection so we won’t show a missing turn restriction when OSM already has a ‘only straight on’ restriction.

Happy Mapping!

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Turn restrictions – a vital part of any routing system

The best part of using everyday OSM technologies and relying on OSM to make sure that you get “there” on time is that you can directly influence the quality of the experience.

Regardless which OSM technology you’ll be using, to provide you the best experience possible, the routing software has to know as much information as possible about the roads between you and your destination: one-way streets, turn restrictions, speed limits, road closures and much more.

For example, the turn restrictions contribute significantly to the total travel time, and to the correctness of the route altogether, thus, by ignoring them in the traffic network model, essential characteristics of the network might be missed, leading to substandard and unreasonable paths.

Dealing with turn restrictions in OSM

To help us navigate the complexities of properly translating real map scenarios to the ways and points schema of OSM we will rely on JOSM with the turn restrictions plugin installed.

Turn restrictions in OSM are handled by creating a relation

A relation is one of the core data elements that consists of one or more tags and also and ordered list of one or more nodes, ways and/or relations as members which is used to define logical or geographic relationships between other elements. (source)

There is a mandatory requirement when creating a turn restriction relation: it has to consist of minimum three members and must have assigned two tags. (see below example)

structure
The ‘type=restriction’ flags the relation as a turn restriction and ‘restriction=no_u_turn’ indicates the restriction type.

A ‘no_’ type relation can also be represented in map data as an ‘only_’ type relation. The prohibited turn restriction relation is preferred by some routing engines instead of an allowed turn restriction relation.

More details here - https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Relation:restriction
More details here – https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Relation:restriction; US regulatory signs – http://mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov/services/publications/fhwaop02084/

Members of a turn restriction relation are ways and nodes

One simple case can be a turn restriction relation that consists of three members – two ways and one node. The two ways would represent the beginning (‘from’ role) and end (‘to’ role) of the turn restriction. The node would represent the continuity of travel between two ways and has a ‘via’role.

Way (A) - node (B) - way (C) sequence
Way (A) – node (B) – way (C) sequence in a ‘no_left_turn’ restriction relation.

Another case is where a turn restriction relation can consist of three or more ways. Two ways from this type of relation would represent the beginning and end of the turn restriction and at least one way would represent the continuity of travel between the aforementioned ways (‘via’ role).

Way (A) - way (B) - way (C) sequence in a no_u_turn restriction relation
Way (A) – way (B) – way (C) sequence in a ‘no_u_turn’ restriction relation.

Workflow for adding turn restrictions

The traditional way

Using the embedded relation editor available in JOSM. A slight disadvantage of this method is that you spend a bit more time to manually construct the relation. Click on the image below for how-to video.

traditional_way_vid

The user-friendly way

Using the turn restrictions plugin, that automatically recognizes the type of relation and roles for each member. Click on the image below for how-to video.

user_friendly_vid

Using the aforementioned tools, we have reviewed 2,000 miles of field trip footage and added nearly 2,500 turn restrictions in the LA/Orange county area, where 85% of the turn restrictions that were added to the map are no_u_turns, followed by 11% of no_left_turns, the rest being covered by the other categories.

Hopefully we’ve managed to illustrate how easy is to map turn restrictions in OSM. Now, it’s your turn!

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ImproveOSM with your own GPS data – a Field Report

We launched ImproveOSM about 6 months ago as a way to turn the vast amounts of GPS data that Scout users give us into useful and actionable hints mappers can use to add turn restrictions, missing roads as well as wrong or missing one-way streets. The response has been incredible — since we launched, more than 26 thousand hints have been processed, leading to more than 16 thousand improvements to the map worldwide. I think that is a fantastic result, and we will keep working to make ImproveOSM better based on your feedback.
Initially, we just used our own GPS data to generate the hints. But there is no reason why we couldn’t process any GPS data we can get from other sources. So I was really excited when long time Brazil mapper Wille Marcel got in touch with a cool idea. He worked with the Brazilian Environment Ministry, which collects GPS data of the vehicles that work in environmental monitoring. Most of the data are in rural areas where OSM is much less complete. So this was a perfect fit for ImproveOSM’s missing roads tool.After getting the proper permissions from the agency, Wille sent us the GPS data and we started analyzing it.

sparse-missing-roads

We quickly realized that the GPS data is much less dense than what we are used to working with. Some missing roads were only driven once. Our algorithm, tuned to higher density data, initially only detected a few tiles. We decided to loosen the detection threshold significantly for this particular dataset. After a few iterations of tweaking and testing, we ended up withmore than 5000 tiles containing missing roads based on Wille’s GPS data.

overview

The missing roads in Brazil are on ImproveOSM now, so why not go to the web site or fire up the ImproveOSM JOSM plugin and help the Brazilian community out by adding some missing roads?

If you are in a similar position as Wille and know of a source of free and open GPS data for your country, please get in touch with me so we can look at the data and see if we can include it in ImproveOSM.

We are already working with a number of other folks who have lots of GPS data. Soon, the number of missing roads, one-ways, and turn restrictions in ImproveOSM will be much, much bigger. We are also working on a host of new features, so I hope you will stay tuned to the ImproveOSM blog to be among the first to hear about what we have up our sleeves for ImproveOSM and other OSM related projects we are working on. And follow us on Twitter at @ImproveOSM!

 See also Wille’s post about this collaboration (in Portuguese).

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